NPRP

National Priorities Research Program (NPRP)

The National Priorities Research Program (NPRP) is an initiative of Qatar National Research Fund (QNRF) that aims to build human capital in Qatar, fund research to benefit the nation, region, and the world, and raise Qatar's profile within the international research community.

 

National Priorities Research Program (NPRP)

The NPRP funding cycle occurs once yearly, and opens for submission in the Fall of each year. The application is through an online system, and involves the completion of several sections.

Learn more about applying to NPRP.


 

 

 

SFS-Q NPRP Awards

Faculty members at Georgetown's School of Foreign Service in Qatar have received a number of NPRP awards to study topics of important to Qatar's national development or national interests.

Use the list below to learn about projects that were awarded by NPRP.

 

Boundaries of Personal Autonomy in Islamic Bioethics in Light of the Debate on Euthanasia

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Ayman Shabana

Description:

This project examines the place and limits of personal autonomy in the realm of Islamic bioethical deliberations in light of the debate on the permissibility of euthanasia. The choice of this example is meant to highlight the perceived tension between individual freedom and religious authority and the extent to which personal autonomy is or ought to be qualified by such authority. The project investigates whether any form of induced death can be permitted or excused and explores the extent to which a decision to end the life of a terminally-ill person can be justified or qualified by certain restrictions from a normative Islamic perspective.


Structure of the Nuclear Family in the Wake of Genetic and Reproductive Technologies

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Ayman Shabana
  • Mohamed Ghali (Qatar Faculty of Islamic Studies)

Description:

This project aims to identify research lacunae in current scholarship on new technical variables on contemporary Islamic thought and practice pertaining to the structure of the nuclear family. It will build on several years of original research, which benefited from the research infrastructure that was established and funded by two three-year NPRP grants. This project will consist of a bibliographic component and a research component. The bibliographic component will maintain and expand the existing physical collection and electronic database of resources, which includes records of more than 3000 bilingual (English-Arabic) scholarly resources. The research component will utilize these resources in exploring the impact of new genetic and reproductive technologies on the Islamic conceptualizations of the nuclear family in terms of both the (re)formulation of relevant rules as well as the administration of these rules.


Myth in Mexican, Bengali, and Turkish Literature (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Ian Almond

Description:

This project builds on the work accomplished in last year’s project. It continues a trajectory of interest in the essence of comparative literature, but this time emphasizing myth, the re-telling and re-enactment of mythic structures, in a variety of texts. The expected outcome will be three chapters that address Mexican, Bengali, and Turkish facets of myth re-narration initially published as articles, but ultimately resulting in a book.


Narrating the Arab Uprisings: The Case of Tunisian Fiction (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Omar Khalifah

Description:

Using this grant, Prof. Khalifah examines the Tunisian fictional narratives that were published in Tunisia since 2011. It focuses on how Tunisian novelists and short story writers have approached, represented, and responded to the uprising that has toppled the regime of Ben Ali and ushered in a wave of similar protests across the Arab world. The project explores whether the Tunisian uprising has opened up new writing strategies for fiction writers and if the Tunisian novel and short story have been undergoing radical alterations, either thematically or stylistically.


Africa’s Illiberal State-Builders (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Harry Verhoeven

Description:

This project focuses on Africa’s post-liberation movements and their visions of “illiberal state-building” in a changing international system. Since the early 1990s, two opposing paradigms of African politics have competed for preeminence: the optimistic view that saw developing countries converging on the liberal-democratic model and the pessimistic view that developing states could not cope with refugee flows, ecological degradation, and shrinking patronage networks which is why they exerted only de jure sovereignty in a cycle of state-failure and contributed to global instability. Prof. Verhoeven argues that a number of experiences that fit neither of these paradigms remain unexamined and the existence of alternate agendas in places like Ethiopia, Sudan, and Rwanda is part of an emerging illiberal mode of state-building in Africa.


Democratization, Religion, and Governance (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Sonia Alonso Saenz De Oger
  • Sohaira Siddiqui

Description:

This edited volume will be the result of a symposium co-sponsored by SFS-Q, GU’s Berkley Center, and GU’s Global Futures Initiative. The symposium will explore the relationship between religion and democratization across different religious traditions and world regions, with a particular focus on Christianity in Europe and the Americas and Islam in the Middle East and Asia. It will build knowledge by bringing together scholars from SFS-Q and main campus around areas of mutual interest.


Force and Fraternity: Sovereignty, International Law, and the French Revolution (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Edward Kolla

Description:

This project continues Prof. Kolla’s work on a book manuscript on the evolution of, and connections between, legal justifications for territorial claims during the French Revolution. Prof. Kolla’s research contributes to the history of international law and his legal methodology allows for departure from the established historiography of the French Revolution. Special attention is paid to the changing law of conquest, which illustrates that rather than abandon the heady principles of the early Revolution to pursue a program of chauvinistic expansion, those principles and that expansion were interlined almost from the start.


The American Mission: Americans and the Arab Gulf, 1889-1950 (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Karine Walther

Description:

Under this project, Prof. Walther continues work on her second book which chronicles the history of the relationship between American missionary activities and ARAMCO, as well as the origins of American economic and strategic power in the Middle East. It demonstrates that in the process, non-state actors played a central role in shaping resource diplomacy over oil concessions in the Middle East in the period between 1900 and 1950.

 


Manipulating Electoral Externalities in Multi-level Systems (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Sonia Alonso Saenz De Oger

Description:

Prof. Alonso hypothesizes that electoral externalities can be manufactured by political parties as yet another electoral strategy to win votes or to minimize electoral losses in Spain. The outcome of this project will be a peer-reviewed journal article based on content analysis of party manifestos in regional and national elections in Spain.


A History of the Passport (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Edward Kolla

Description:

This grant allows Prof. Kolla to continue his study of the passport in the European world, from the early modern period until the early twentieth century. The research examines questions of identity, nationality, boundary, and legitimacy.


Prehistoric Myths in Modern Political Philosophy (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Karl Widerquist

Description:

This project continues Prof. Widerquist’s work on his co-authored book, with Dr. Grant McCall, at the University of Sydney. This project employs anthropological evidence to shed light on debates in modern political philosophy. Specifically, this project uses theories on the political and economic systems of hunter-gatherer societies to examine a series of political theories, including the natural rights defense of private property, the social contract theory and theories employing a Lockean proviso.


Tense, Mood, and Aspect in Arabic (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Ahmad Alqassas

Description:

This project explores the syntax of the functional categories tense, mood, and aspect in Arabic, which presents interesting questions regarding the clause structure of Arabic such as the availability of these categories in simple and complex tense constructions and in verb-less sentences. Prof. Alqassas investigates these questions by bringing data primarily from Southern Levantine and Gulf Arabic countries.


Toward a Cross-Religious Meta-Language of Metaphysics: An Inquiry into Frithjof Schuon’s Lexicon 1907-1998 (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Patrick Laude

Description:

Prof. Laude’s work is a study of why and how Frithjof Schuon uses a number of key metaphysical terms to understand the religious experience. Schuon borrows these terms from specific religious or theological traditions while lending to them a spectrum of meanings that sometimes lie outside the strict confines of these respective traditional or confessional worlds. This study is aimed at the development of a cross-religious lexicon that could function as a kind of meta-language in the study of comparative religion and comparative mysticism.


Justice as the Pursuit of Accord (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Karl Widerquist

Description:

Prof. Widerquist draws from this grant to build on a book manuscript titled Justice as the Pursuit of Accord (JPA): Basic Income and Economic Ethics. JPA is both the name of the book and the name of the foundational theory of distributive justice. The book follows on from Prof. Widerquist’s recent book, Freedom, Propertylessness, and Basic Income: A Theory of Freedom as the Power to Say No, which outlined the JPA theory. This project thus lays out the JPA theory more fully and applies the theory to justifications of government authority and property rights.

 


Price Behavior and Promotions (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Alexis Antoniades

Description:

Prof. Antoniades aims to study how non-price promotions such as bundles and free gifts affect price setting behavior. Using scanner level data from six Gulf countries, he documents that these non-price promotions account for a large portion of total sales and that their significance rises with time. He argues that it is essential to study how their availability changes what is already known about price setting behavior.


A History of the Pashtun Nation (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Anatol Lieven

Description:

Prof. Lieven will continue to examine Pashtun history in order to develop a view of modern nationalism, which draws on “primordialist” and “constructivist” analyses of nationalism while also critiquing both. The outcome of this research is expected to be a production of work that will cover the history of the entire Pashtun ethnicity including Afghanistan, Pakistan, and the Pashtun diaspora.


Interest Group Politics (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Clyde Wilcox

Description:

This grant will be used to produce a new edition of Prof. Wilcox’s book, Interest Group Society. This new edition will involve substantial updates to the lobby disclosure process as well as updated data on campaign finance in the United States.


Networks and the Gains from New Transportation Infrastructure (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Jose Asturias

Description:

Prof. Asturias’s work asks whether improved transportation infrastructure changes the economic outcomes of a country. Changing transportation costs could deliver gains by allowing highly productive superstar suppliers to play a more important role in the economy. Prof. Asturias will devise a quantitative model of trade that accounts for the network structure of the economy at the firm-to-firm level and measure the effects of these production networks on aggregate productivity. The outcome of this research will be a paper that develops methodologies for evaluating gains from new transportation infrastructure incorporating intermediate input usage.


European External Intervention in the Middle East: 1967-2014 (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Rory Miller

Description:

Prof. Miller will use this grant to build on his existing research on how European intervention in the Middle East has been a central driver in the development of EU institutions and foreign policy mechanisms. He will further develop his argument that the Middle East is so central to Europe’s foreign policy development precisely because Europe has used regional issues, notably the Arab-Israeli conflict and, more recently, the Iranian nuclear crisis, as vehicles to drive forward its ambition of achieving global status as a foreign policy player.


Imagining Industan: Overcoming Water Insecurity in the Indus Basin (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Robert Wirsing

Description:

This project is a multi-authored edited volume on water security in the Indus basin. It is unique in that its central focus is the capacity and potential of the Indus basin’s four co-riparian states (Afghanistan, China, India, and Pakistan) to move towards integrated basin-wide management of the Indus River basin’s water resources.


The Muslim Brotherhood in the Gulf (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Birol Baskan

Description:

Prof. Baskan continues his research to critically assess, interpret, and analyze the perplexing conflict between the Muslim Brotherhood and the states of Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and the UAE, compared to the lack of such conflict in Qatar, Bahrain, and Oman. Prof. Baskan addresses the question of what explains this variation across the Gulf states and seeks to make a crucial contribution and corrective analysis to the study of religion, political transformation, and social change in the context of rentier states where religious opposition on the grounds of social justice, identity rights, and civic entitlements is not conceived.

 


The Arabic Phoneme ‘Ji:m’ between Phonology and Orthography (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Yehia Mohamed

Description:

This research aims to track the development of the phoneme ‘Jim’ in Arabic history, the current variations of ‘Jim’ across the Arabic deflects, and its relationship with the orthography of the letter ‘Jim.’


Bengal’s Beleaguered Borders: Is there a Fix for the Indian Subcontinent’s Transboundary Problems? (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Robert Wirsing

Description:

This project is an occasional paper being prepared for publication by SFS-Q’s Center for International and Regional Studies (CIRS) that assesses five major transboundary-related problems currently facing the Bengal region and bedeviling, in particular, the relationship between Bangladesh and India. The focus of the paper is on the potential and capacity of the political entities sharing the Bengal region to identify, agree upon, and implement effective and sustainable solutions to these problems.


Lab and Field Experiments (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Mongoljin Batsaikhan

Description:

Prof. Batsaikhan continues work on price matching experiments, tournaments among small and medium enterprises in Mongolia, and daycare matching. Additionally, he will explore the possibility of conducting similar experiments and tournaments in the Gulf region, or even in the larger Arab region.


Pressing Interests: The Politico-economics of an East African Newspaper Sector (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Phoebe Musandu

Description:

This grant will allow Prof. Musandu to continue work on her book manuscript that examines the establishment and publication of secular Kenyan newspapers between 1899 and 1963. Prof. Musandu argues that most newspapers were established to enable the interests that controlled them to permeate the political field and sectors of the economy that usually had little or nothing to do with newspapers or the media.


Arabic as a Heritage Language in the United States: College Students (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Hana Zabarah

Description:

Prof. Zabarah investigates the oral production of Arabic among three Arab-American communities: Iraqi, Lebanese, and Yemeni. She focuses on college-level students in three U.S. universities that offer Arabic as a heritage language: Columbia University, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and University of California San Diego. The study consists of an online survey that gathers linguistic background information from participants and oral interviews to gather narratives in Arabic in order to analyze salient features of participants’ oral production.


Translation of Tawfiq al-Hakim’s work ‘Arini Ellah- Show Me God (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Abdul Rahman Chamseddine

Description:

Tawfiq al-Hakim is one of the most prominent playwrights and novelists in his native Egypt and in the broader Arab World. This project will translate one major Arabic work written by the author that consists of 20 short stories, which will play a vital role in reading literature cross-culturally.

 


Material Silence: Emily Dickinson, Herman Melville, Posthuman Poetics (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Amy Nestor

Description:

This grant will be used to further develop Prof. Nestor’s monograph titled, Material Silence. The book explores the work of Emily Dickinson and Herman Melville through the recent materialist turn in criticism. The project advances the work of New Materialist thought on a theoretical level, in particular by insisting upon the inclusion of language as a material force and by proposing a new understanding of the nature of Spirit.

 


When Cities Fight Back: Minorities, Local Politics, and Conflict in Comparative Perspective (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Amanda Garrett

Description:

The objective of this project is to explore why religious and ethnic minorities engage in violent conflict with the state as a means of political expression in some localities but not in others. By studying both events and non-events of rioting, Prof. Garrett proposes that the entrenchment of local political elites and their strategic social alliances with minority groups deeply condition both the initial likelihood of violent confrontation and how it is managed at the local level. Her argument challenges existing interpretations of minority collective violence based on national models of integration, cultural variables, and socio-economic inequality.


Missions, Empire, and the Making of a Vernacular Christianity in Modern South Asia (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Uday Chandra

Description:

Prof. Chandra explores why some of the most marginalized sections of Indian society convert to Christianity in the nineteenth century. He delves deeper into the contexts and motivations of conversions as well as the processes that kept the marginalized within the Christian fold. The approach is micro-historical, reading against the grain of the sources and juxtaposing fragments with each other to discover latent connections. At the same time, the archival research is informed by social theory and an awareness of the interconnections between sources and contexts in India and Europe.


Legal Politics of the Sino-Tibetan Frontier and the Making of Modern Tibet, 1792-1940 (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Max Oidtmann

Description:

Prof. Oidtmann’s research focuses on the legal culture of Tibet and China during the Qing dynasty and Republic of China. Emphasis is placed on primary Tibetan sources and the completion of the Tibetan-language research for his book, Between Patron and Priest: Qing Legal Culture and the Creation of a “Tibetan World” in Amdo, 1720-1912.


Develop a Computer Application that Trains the User to Draw the Arabic Letter ‘Hamza’ Correctly in Arabic (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Mahmoud Al-Ashiri

Description:

The aim of this project is the development of application software” to train users how to draw the ‘Hamza’ correctly in Arabic. Drawing on the latest research about education and computing skills, it will produce educational content and software that is directly relevant to the needs of Arabic learners.


Translation, Humanism, and Culture Planning: The Making of World Literature in Turkey, 1930-1970 (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Firat Oruc

Description:

This project examines the connections between national identity and translation by investigating the construction of a state-sponsored world literature canon as a project of national “cultural planning” in Turkey. The focus is on the ways in which the architectonic language revolution shaped the translation of “World Classics” into modern Turkish in line with a strong commitment to the ideals of humanism and secularism.


History Revisited in the Work of the Saudi Writer Raja Alem (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Amira El Zein

Description:

This grant helps Prof. El-Zein to continue work on her book about the dramatic changes occurring in Saudi Arabia. She focuses on the Saudi writer, Raja Alem, and discusses with her the Wahhabi demolition of numerous historical, cultural, and sacred sites in the country, particularly in Mecca.


Mother of the Nation: Pakistan and Gender Through the Life of Fatima Jinnah (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Reza Pirbhai

Description:

Prof. Pirbhai uses this grant to author a book about Fatima Jinnah, herself a revolutionary, and also the sister of Muhammad Ali Jinnah, former President of the All India Muslim League and first Governer-General of Pakistan. The project explores the life of Fatima Jinnah and significantly ties her to the historiography of colonialism and nationalism, while also establishing her place in the discourse on women and Islam.


Arabic Heritage Learners Corpus (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Hany Fazza

Description:

Prof. Fazza aims to compile the first Arabic learners corpus, which are collections of authentic texts generated by native or non-native language learners accumulated in electronic format, of Arabic heritage learners. The Arabic Heritage Learners Corpus (AHLC) will comprise collections of written texts for academic purposes from Arabic heritage learners in the undergraduate level in the gulf region.

 


Presentations at two International Conferences in London, UK and in Dakar, Senegal (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Patricia Reynaud

Description:

Prof. Reynaud will present at two conferences: one in the United Kingdom organized by the Leverhulme International Network and titled, “Childhood and Nation in World Cinemas: Borders and Encounters since 1980,” and the other at the international colloquium organized by the Conseil International d’Etudes Francophones (CIEF) in Dakar, Senegal. The papers presented at these conferences will be revised and submitted for publication with peer-reviewed journals.


Geography of Savings: Evidence from Rural China (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Zhaoyang Hou

Description:

Prof. Hou explores the reasons behind why the saving rate, generally, is higher in developing countries than in developed countries. The focus of this study is on the non-income factors that most widely weaken incentives for precautionary savings.


Overcoming Barriers to International Migration (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Ganesh Seshan

Description:

This study consists of a randomized control trial to test whether reducing informational barriers to international migration from Kerala would impact migration decision by households. The first part of this project took place in 2011 when a set of information flyers on potential wages, costs, and procedures were randomly distributed to 15,000 households in Kerala using a control-treatment framework. The current project involves a follow up survey to determine whether household members’ decisions to migrate or not were influenced by the information provided. This entails revisiting the households that were previously interviewed in 2011.


Darfur Allegory (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Rogaia Abusharaf

Description:

This grant will allow Prof. Abusharaf to continue work on her book manuscript, Darfur Allegory. Prof. Abusharaf’s manuscript discusses some of the most complex issues in the social sciences and raises questions about the apprehension of diaspora, mediation, border politics, race, color, and gender. The research is drawn from eight years of comparative and multi-sited ethnographic materials, which are used to conduct systematic comparisons regarding responses worldwide to the devastation in Darfur.


Gender Differentiation in Intergenerational Care-giving and its Influence on Migration (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Zhaoyang Hou

Description:

Prof. Hou’s research focuses on the idea that many cultures and religions encourage adult children to act as care-givers to their parents or to their parents-in-law. In general, there is no gender-specificity in this regard, meaning that children are held responsible regardless of gender. The hypothesis links together gender differences in intergenerational care-giving, and gender differences in migration choices. Because the expected gain from demonstrating the provision of attention and care to parents is greater for daughters than for sons, and because it is more effective and less costly to demonstrate care if they live near to each other, the hypothesis is that daughters migrate less frequently and less far from the parental home than sons.


Islamic Criminal Law and Human Rights in the Maldives (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Sohaira Siddiqui

Description:

Prof. Siddiqui’s research is on one of the most contentious aspects of Islamic Law, the scripturally legislated criminal punishments (hudud). Recently, the government of the Maldives joined the countries that have incorporated these criminal punishments within their legal system, but have done so in a way that minimizes violations of human rights. In this project, Prof. Siddiqui explores the jurisprudential and interpretative process by which Islamic criminal laws were both incorporated and changed to fit with modern human rights standards.

 


Sacred Fury: Engaging Religion and Violence in Contemporary Nigeria (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Akintunde Akinade

Description:

The essence of this project is to understand the various dimensions of religiously motivated violence in Nigeria with a focus on the Boko Haram movement in northern Nigeria. It involves library and archival research in Nigeria, and the research will ultimately culminate in a book manuscript for a university press.


Civil-Military Relations in Contemporary Middle East (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Mehran Kamrava

Description:

This research examines the prevailing patterns of civil-military relations in the post Arab Spring Middle East with an emphasis on eight representative case studies, namely Algeria, Egypt, Iran, Jordan, Morocco, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. In each of the eight cases, the research will focus on separate but interrelated variables: composition, professionalization, institutionalization, economic interests, and involvement in policy processes.


Salafism: Documents and Narratives (Faculty Research Grant 2015)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Amira Sonbol

Description:

Prof. Sonbol focuses on the application of principles of Salafism to state and social institutions, particularly education and philanthropy. She continues her work on a monograph on the subject and to connect that to a book project about the history of the Islamic Sharia. Prof. Sonbol will also develop new media forms for internet communication presenting narratives through the use of manuscripts. Here awqaf and the Azhar constitute the primary focus of this effort, both central to political and Salafist discourses.


Millennial Politics and the Culture Wars (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Clyde Wilcox

Description:

This project will compile a massive dataset of the attitudes of Americans on culture war issues over the past 10 years in order to fully explore the source of the Millennial’s unusual combination of issue positions. The dataset will include a variety of culture war issues, including sex education, GLBT rights, abortion, gender equality, gun control, school prayer, affirmative action, euthanasia, and legalized marijuana. A number of demographic variables will be included that will enable a comparison of various subsets of respondents, including state, gender, and age.


Developing iOS/Android App for Practicing Preposition and Postposition in Arabic (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Hany Fazza

Description:

The purpose of this project is to create and implement an interactive mobile application for non-native students of Arabic and heritage students alike. The application will focus on intensive practice for preposition and postpositions in Arabic.


Presentations at two International Conferences: Aix en Provence, France and Dakar Senegal (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Patricia Reynaud

Description:

Under this grant, Prof. Reynaud plans to conduct research to support presentations at two conferences: one in Aix en Provence, France and the other at the international colloquium organized by the Conseil International d’Etudes Francophones (CIEF) in Dakar, Senegal. Her work focuses on a Senegalese writer, Cheikh Hamidou Kane who published an award-winning book in 1961 titled,Ambiguous Adventure. She reexamines this novel, 50 years after its publication, and writes about her experience of teaching Muslim students in Qatar.


Water Security and Conflict Prevention in the Indus Basin (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Robert Wirsing

Description:

The objective of this project is to illuminate prospects for peaceful adaptation to the common problem of water resource scarcity by Afghanistan, China, India, and Pakistan sharing the waters of the Indus basin. Research in the initial phase focuses on two dimensions of Pakistan’s political and institutional capacity. The first dimension explores the capacity for improved governance and institutional frameworks for managing water resources within Pakistan at national, inter-provincial, and local levels. The second dimension explores the capacity for improved coordination between Pakistan and India in relation to new hydroelectric power projects on Indus River system.


The Natural and the Normative (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Jeremy Koons

Description:

Under this project, Prof. Koons continues his co-authored work with Dr. Michael P. Wolf from Washington and Jefferson College. This project, a book manuscript, examines recent trends in naturalism and defends an account of normative discourse, which departs in significant ways from naturalist orthodoxy while still fitting in with a scientific world view.


Nasser in the Egyptian Imaginary (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Omar Khalifah

Description:

This project examines the representation of late Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser (1918-1970) in Egyptian literature and film. It focuses on how the historical character of Nasser has emerged in the Egyptian imaginary- novel, short stories, autobiographies, and films. Prof. Khalifah makes a case for literature and art as alternative archive that questions, erases, distorts, and adds to the official history of Nasser.

 


History of Islam in Latin America (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Ian Almond

Description:

Under this project, Prof. Almond continues his work in drawing attention to the 500-year-old presence of Islam and Islamic cultures in Latin America- from the presence of Moriscos in the very first boats, through the appearance of Islamic influence on Catholic architecture, to the extensive Arab nineteenth and twentieth century immigration.

 


Students’ Errors: Survey and Evaluation Approach; Towards a Practical Method for Building Fluency (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Yehia Mohamed
  • Mahmoud Al-Ashiri

Description:

This project aims to present a wide collection of various drills with an answer-key appendix based on basic Arabic grammar that provide learners with an appropriate level of sound language, in addition to a focus on correcting the most popular mistakes in syntax and vocabulary. These drills will rely on research of varied samples of students with different educational, geographical, and linguistic backgrounds- the common factor among them is learning Modern Standard Arabic.


Reimagining Religious Identity: Engaging Chrislam in Contemporary Nigeria (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Akintunde Akinade

Description:

This project aims to provide a new approach to the study of religion in contemporary Nigeria. It underscores the role and importance of African agency in the transmission and transformation of religion in Nigeria. It offers a new perspective on interreligious borrowing and belonging and provides new ways of approaching interreligious engagement.


Arabic as a Heritage Language (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Hana Zabarah

Description:

Prof. Zabarah will continue her research on Arabic as a heritage language in America by investigating the oral production of Arabic in the Yemeni American community, ages 12-17, in Dearborn, Michigan. The first part of the project involves completing an online survey to gather linguistic background information, maintenance of the language, and attitudes towards the language and culture. The second part involves recording individual interviews to gather narratives in Arabic in order to analyze salient features of their oral production.


Islamic Lineage Regulations and Modern Biomedical Technology (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Ayman Shabana

Description:

This is an ongoing research project that examines the interface between modern biomedical technology and Islamic law and ethics. It aims to assess the influence of techniques such as DNA testing and other assisted reproductive technologies on Islamic family law and Islamic lineage structure by examining the extent to which these new techniques challenge established notions of the nuclear family and the responses of the Islamic normative system on these challenges. In addition to analyzing the pronouncements of authoritative religious bodies on these issues, the project will also explore these issues within the context of a number of Muslim-majority countries, where legal/legislative response have been developed.


How Promotions Affect Measures of International Price Differences (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Alexis Antoniades

Description:

The purpose of this project is to investigate how the popularity of promotions, and in particular non-price promotions such as volume off and bundles, affect international price comparisons. Because the current methodology of measuring international price differences only considers identical consumption baskets and fails to account for variation in the utilization of promotions, it potentially overstates prices in developed countries and understates prices in developing countries. Data will be used to identify how important it is to include promotions in the calculations and how to improve existing methodologies.


Normative Status of Custom in Islamic Law between Tradition and Modernity (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Ayman Shabana

Description:

This project explores the role of custom in Islamic law with a special focus on the modern period. Tracing the development of the concept of custom in the Islamic legal tradition illustrates juristic engagement of the important notions of continuity and change, and is therefore, important for understanding


Sources, Symptoms, and Solutions of Sectarianism in the Middle East (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Mark Farha

Description:

This project grows out of Prof. Farha’s prior research of secularism and sectarianism in Lebanon and the Levant. The focus will be on the recent, troubling sectarian fissure, which has opened up across the region. The project will also reexamine the debate about the sustainability of the current nation-state borders in the region, both historically, and in light of the ongoing upsurge of trans-national, sectarian networks which threaten to eclipse the sovereignty of the nation states established in wake of Sykes Picot and WWI.


Pressing Interests: An East African Newspaper History (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Phoebe Musandu

Description:

Prof. Musandu will use this grant to conduct research that will enable the revision of two chapters of the book manuscript she wrote that examines the establishment and publication of various secular Kenyan newspapers between 1899 and 1960. The two chapters deal with European (British) – owned East African newspapers and study the intricacies of the relationship between European settlers in Kenya and print media owners.


Salafism: Politics and Discourses (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Amira Sonbol

Description:

This project continues Prof. Sonbol's analysis of the intellectual origins of Salafism. While Salafism is understood as a political and religious movement, her research traces the construction of Salafism as a modern system of thought, and considers its role, past and present, in the evolution of Arabic and Muslim thought more broadly.


Beyond the Economics of Peace: External Intervention, Conflict Resolution, and the Palestinian State-Building Project (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Rory Miller

Description:

This research project will adopt an empirical methodological approach that uses data analysis and comparative case studies to examine how and why outside parties have engaged in Palestinian state building as part of the conflict-resolution process and whether such approaches have benefited external parties in terms of influence and local parties in terms of peace.


Commitment to Wellness (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Ganesh Seshan

Description:

This research project proposes to pilot test the impact of using commitment contracts to maximize the success of achieving one’s personal goals of maintaining a healthy lifestyle. A commitment contract is a promise by an individual to achieve a personal goal and be held accountable. The ingredients of the contracts are inspired by insights from behavioral economics- that goal setting, with the right mix of incentives, accountability, and social engagement, can potentially create real behavior change.


Comparative Study of Negation in Arabic (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Ahmad Alqassas

Description:

This project investigates the syntax of negation in dialectal and Standard Arabic by comparing the similarities and differences among these varieties. This research contributes to our understanding of the language faculty as well as to our understanding of how the grammatical phenomena under investigation are really acquired by native speakers.


Qur’anic Terminology in Modern Public Sphere (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Abdul Rahman Chamseddine

Description:

This project will analyze the use of religious language in popular public discourse with an emphasis on its presence in social media so that a range of popular responses may be gauged. A compilation of key terms used to describe religious identities in the Arab world as well as other countries that have been influenced by Islam will then be analyzed to see what they mean in their current social context in comparison with uses in other languages or dialects and their likely original meanings in the Qur’an.


For God, Oil and Country: American in Arabia, 1889-1933 (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Karine Walther

Description:

This project looks at the work of the American Dutch reform missionaries in Arabia between 1889 and 1933. Prof. Walther will examine how American missionaries established themselves in the Kingdom and how this facilitated King Saud’s decision to grant oil concessions to the United States in 1933.


Androgyny as Ambiguity in the Fiction of Tahar Ben Jelloun and Raja Alem (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Amira El Zein

Description:

This grant will allow Prof. El-Zein to continue research on Francophone literature, but from a different angle. Two novels will be compared- a novel by the Moroccan Tahar Ben Jelloun, who writes in French, to a novel by Raja Alem, the female writer from Saudi Arabia who writes in Arabic. A discussion with both authors will occur in order to answer the question of androgyny as it is treated in their novels, on psychological, social, and gender levels.


The Lake Mohonk Conference of the Friends of the Indians and Other Dependent Peoples (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Karine Walther

Description:

This project continues Prof. Walther’s work on religion and American empire by focusing on the “Lake Mohonk Conference of Friends of the Indian and Other Dependent Peoples.” This nineteenth and early twentieth century “think tank” united policy makers, former presidents, missionaries, and religious organizations to formulate and recommend policies on the combined issues of the “Indian Problem,” the “Negro Problem,” and later, the Philippines. The project analyzes how religious organizations have shaped American domestic and imperial policies through these types of organizations.


A Parallel Literary History of Bengal, Mexico, and Turkey (1925-75) (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Ian Almond

Description:

The aim of this grant is to continue writing a manuscript that examines possible parallels in twentieth century Mexican, Bengali, and Turkish fiction. Prof. Almond looks to offer a series of reflections not only on the literary texts written during this period, but also on the evolution of different projects of modernity undertaken in three very different regions.


The Politics of Hope (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Joshua Mitchell

Description:

This book project relies on the thinking of Reinhold Nieburh, the last great American political theologian of the twentieth century. Prof. Mitchell grapples with what happened, both political and religiously, after the Mainline Protestant churches in America imploded during the Vietnam War era. He argues that a number of different strands spun off when that implosion occurred, all of which are still with us today, and none of which offer us a coherent enough vision on the basis of which to move forward politically or religiously in America.


Mystical Mediations (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Patrick Laude

Description:

This project continues Prof. Laude’s inquiry in metaphysical issues of mediation in mystical theology. He intends to engage in a cross-religious comparative study of bhedabheda, an Indian notion often rendered by “difference-nondifference” and barzakh, a polysemic Islamic word that designates an intermediary area between two distinct domains that it relates, and often translates into English by the word “isthmus.” He also intends to focus on the paradox of means of knowledge of the Unknowable in Sufism and Buddhism: the Sufi “god of imagination” and the Buddhist “expedient mean.”


Safeguarding Food and Environment in Qatar (SAFE-Q)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Emel Aktas, Brunel University
  • Zeynep Topaloglu
  • Amir Sharif, Brunel University
  • Zahir Irani, Brunel University
  • Samsul Huda

Description:

Safeguarding Food and Environment in Qatar (SAFE-Q) is a 3-year joint research project (NPRP 7 - 1103 - 5 - 156) involving Georgetown University in Qatar, Cranfield University and Brunel University in the UK and the University of Western Sydney in Australia. The project isimplemented through a research grant from Qatar National Research Fund (QNRF) and explores the issue of food waste in Qatar.

The project involves undertaking a detailed analysis of supply and demand sides, examining thecauses of food waste occurring in particular during the handling, distribution, transportation and storage as well as during food preparation, cooking and consumption.

After structuring the problem, this project involves developing simulation models of food waste, assessing risks and identifying and providing policy recommendations to reduce, and eliminate where possible, the waste.

Ultimately the project aims to promote food waste reduction as a complementary strategy to Qatar’s ongoing efforts for achieving food security and environmental sustainability as well as contribute to the implementation of the “Qatar National Vision 2030″, thereby focusing on the long-term sustainability of the food supply chain and the interconnection between the four principles of economic, human, social and environmental development as outlined in this nation’s strategy for 2030.


Assessing the Effectiveness of Interfaith Initiatives

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Ed Kessler, University of Cambridge, Woolf Institute
  • Patrick Laude
  • Shana Cohen, University of Cambridge, Woolf Institute
  • Ibrahim Al-Naimi, Doha International Center for Interfaith Dialogue

Description:

This study provides the first cross-country comparison of interfaith initiatives in Qatar, UK and India to determine how best to assess their effectiveness in improving interfaith relations. A multi-national, multi-lingual and multi-faith team of investigators has been assembled to conduct the pioneering research. The project will integrate social research, historical and policy analysis, and religious studies to develop a framework for analyzing how interfaith encounters affect change. The study aims to analyze the factors that influence the success and failure of interfaith initiatives and how best to analyze effectiveness across and within different contexts.


Using Half a Trillion Tweets to Analyze Sentiments in the Arab World

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Alexis Antoniades
  • Mazen El-Mazri, Qatar University

Description:

This project recognizes the increased role social media plays in explaining interactions online and offline, and how such interactions contain rich data that can potentially be exploited by scholars due the capacity of the data to revolutionize the way we do research. The important role the social media now plays in driving changes in the Middle East, and the consequences these changes have at both regional and global levels, makes the ability to analyze the vast information from social media expressed in Arabic essential. The project will consequently develop a sentiment analysis tool for tweets in the Arabic language. It will investigate how well existing approaches to sentiment analysis work in Arabic and in turn develop new techniques to improve existing approaches. It will then incorporate data from social media and perform analysis on three distinct topics; the perception of US policy in the Middle East by analyzing the sentiment of both English and Arabic tweets regarding specific events; the role social media played in defining the Arab Spring by incorporating the sentiment analysis tool to study both English and Arabic chatter; and the use of social media in improving measures of country and political risk.


An Experimental Evaluation of the Returns to Skill Training of Migrant Workers in Qatar

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Ganesh Seshan
  • David McKenzie, World Bank

Description:

This project evaluates the impact of skills training for Filipino migrant workers in Qatar. International migration offers the prospect for individuals from developing countries to greatly increase their incomes. However, one concern is that migrants working in less skilled occupations may depreciate their human capital while abroad, limiting their opportunities for productive work upon their return and their prospects for career advancement abroad. A natural, though understudied policy response is to provide overseas migrant workers with training in general purpose skills which can provide temporary migrant workers with a chance to improve their employment and income prospects overseas, while increasing their likelihood of securing better-paying jobs after returning home. This study will consequently evaluate the returns to an existing training program carried out in Doha by the Embassy of the Philippines through a randomized controlled trial in agreement with the Philippines Labor Attaché Office in Doha.


The Dialectic of the Law: Knowledge Society and Continuity in al-Juwayni (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Sohaira Siddiqui

Description:

Prof. Siddiqui’s research looks at the relationship between Islamic theology, jurisprudence, and politics in the 11th century. The monograph produced from this research focuses on the intellectual thought of a jurist by the name of Abu Ma’ali al-Juwayni. The manuscript is almost complete, and Prof. Siddiqui uses this grant to gather some essential research to have it ready for publication.


Ethics and Law in the Courtroom (Faculty Research Grant 2014)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Sohaira Siddiqui

Description:

This project looks at 11th century to 18th century court records to see how judges negotiated law and ethics. Prof. Siddiqui attempts to gain access to otherwise unpublished legal verdicts by Ottoman courts from the Topkapi Ahmet III Library and Sulemaniye Library in Istanbul, which is the basis of this research project.


Impact of Skills Trainings for Filipino Workers (Faculty Research Grant 2013)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Ganesh Seshan

Description:

This research examines the impact of offering a skills-training program to Filipino migrant workers in Qatar and whether it improves their employment prospects in the host country, or increases their ability to pursue job opportunities in their home countries. Specifically, the project studies the impact of an on-going, free computer course offered to Filipino migrant workers in Qatar.


Lending Constraints and Voting Behavior (Faculty Research Grant 2013)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Alexis Antoniades

Description:

The purpose of this project is to study whether changes in lending approval rates, especially during election years affect election outcomes. It questions whether individuals that fail to get a loan or re-finance their home are more likely to vote against the incumbent party out of frustration. The project centers on the presidential elections of 2004, 2008, and 2012, as well as outcomes of the gubernatorial, senate, and congress elections.


The Qing Colonial Legal System and the Making of Modern Tibet (Faculty Research Grant 2013)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Max Oidtmann

Description:

This project furthers Dr. Oidtmann’s ongoing research on the legal culture of Tibet and China during the Qing Dynasty, and expands his research into investigating more fully the ways in which local people understood their involvement with the Qing Colonial Administration.


Surrogacy Arrangements Under Islamic Law and Ethics (Faculty Research Grant 2013)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Ayman Shabana

Description:

Under this grant, Professor Shabana builds on a larger study that examines the impact of modern biomedical and genetic technologies on the perceived and established structure of Islamic family law in general and the area of paternity and lineage in particular. The project questions the extent to which surrogacy arrangements agree or conflict with Islamic and ethical norms.


Debating Darfur (Faculty Research Grant 2013)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Rogaia Abusharaf

Description:

This project draws from five years of comparative and multi-sited ethnographic materials, including participant observation, the collection of life histories, and archival and textual materials. The project will result in a manuscript in which key questions regarding the apprehension of diaspora, mediation, border politics, race, color, and gender are addressed.


Salafism (Faculty Research Grant 2013)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Amira Sonbol

Description:

This project focuses on Salafism as a grid of conceptualization. While Salafism is understood as a political and religious movement, Dr. Sonbol’s research seeks to study its role, past and present, in the construction of Arabic and Muslim thought, as a paradigm of thought, analysis and representation. Most, importantly, it is the construction of Salafism as a modern system that is at the heart and purpose of the project.


World Literature and National Culture: A History of Literacy Translation in Turkey (Faculty Research Grant 2013)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Firat Oruc

Description:

The purpose of this research grant is to investigate state-sponsored indigenous translation programs in the 19th and 20th century Turkey. It explores the connections between national culture and translation by investigating the formation of a world literature canon as part of a future-orientated ‘cultural planning’ in Turkey.


The Arabian Mission: American Missionaries in Saudi Arabia (Faculty Research Grant 2013)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Karine Walther

Description:

This study explores the work of American Dutch reform missionaries in Saudi Arabia between 1889 and 1933. It examines how American Missionaries established themselves in the Kingdom and facilitated King Saud’s decision to grant oil concessions to the United States in 1933.


The Acquisition of Standard Arabic Morphosyntax by Heritage and Native Speakers of Dialectal Arabic (Faculty Research Grant 2013)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Ahmad Alqassas

Description:

The purpose of this project is to identify the grammatical problems Heritage Learners of Arabic have, when compared to Native Speakers, in order to identify the role of dialectal Arabic in acquiring the Standard Arabic grammar. The project also identifies which grammatical problems are caused by structural incompetence and which by morphological incompetence. Heritage subjects are recruited from the United States, and the Native subjects from Qatar. Data is gathered from questionnaires, elicited narratives, and open-ended personal narratives.


Semi-Authentic Listening Material for Heritage Learners (Faculty Research Grant 2013)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Abbas Al-Tonsi

Description:

This project creates semi-authentic listening materials through the production of interviews, lectures, debates and documentaries with Arab Thinkers, Professors and suitable professionals. The materials are part of an anticipated platform for Arabic language learning resources, including reading and listening comprehension passages, as well as structure and vocabulary drills. The home-production of such materials bridges the gap in existing listening material with regards to topic, complexity and language choice, as well as solve the issue of copy-right.


Community Participation and Ethiopia’s Productive Safety Net Program (Faculty Research Grant 2013)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Arjun Bedi

Description:

Professor Bedi utilizes this grant to assess whether Ethiopia’s Productive Safety Net Program (PSNP) has been able to fulfill its mandate for creating quality rural infrastructure and the reasons for its relative failure or success. The research outcomes provide a unique primary data set to assess the role of community participation in selecting and maintaining rural assets in Ethiopia.


Religion and the State in the Arab Gulf States (Faculty Research Grant 2013)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Birol Baskan

Description:

This project continues Dr Baskan’s work on his book on the effects of religion on Arabian Gulf state-development. Specifically, he examines the role of religion, religious figures and religious institutions in the political development of Qatar, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates.


Indus Basin: Impact of Trans-boundary Relations on Pakistan’s Water Security (Faculty Research Grant 2013)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Robert Wirsing

Description:

This research grant explores the issues of water rivalry between Pakistan and India over the Indus River system. In February 2013, the International Court of Arbitration made a landmark decision on India’s Kishenganga Hydro-Electric Project situated on one of the rivers of the Indus system, in which they made a ‘partial’ decision to set forth ground rules for the building of hydroelectric dams on the Indus River system. Professor Wirsing research explores whether the existing 1960 Indus Waters Treaty still remains sufficiently well-supported by Pakistan’s political leadership. Moreover, the research examines whether Pakistan’s political leadership is prepared to give serious consideration to the re-negotiation of the IWT to focus it more directly on institutionalized capacity for basin-wide, integrated trans-boundary cooperation.


Social and Political Discourse in Lebanon regarding the Syrian Revolution (Faculty Research Grant 2013)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Abdul Rahman Chamseddine

Description:

This project analyzes the use of sectarian language in popular public discourse with an emphasis on its presence in social media. Social media, being accessible to a wide swath of Lebanese society, offers an opportunity to gauge a range of popular responses to the situation. The project compiles a list of key terms used to discuss the Syrian Revolution in Lebanese social media, conducts an analysis of what these terms mean in their social and historical context, and tracks the frequency of their use. In turn, the project examines each sect’s justification of their position on the Syrian conflict and considers the implications for Lebanese politics.


Arabic as a Heritage Language: Yemeni Americans (Faculty Research Grant 2013)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Hana Zabarah

Description:

Professor Zabarah centers this research grant on the Yemeni community in the U.S. The research studies and analyzes salient features of their language production and compares their Arabic dialects with other Arabic dialects in the U.S.


West African Religious History: An Introduction (Faculty Research Grant 2013)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Akintunde Akinade

Description:

Under this grant, Dr. Akinade continues his research on a book project with NYU Press regarding West African religious history, and its importance in understanding the economic, social, cultural, and political aspects of the region. The project involves library and archival research in Senegal, Nigeria, Ghana and New York, in order to gain information from important primary documents on West African Islam, African Indigenous Religions and African Pentecostalism.


Exile, Gender, and the Other in the Work of the Morroccan Francophone Writer Tahar ben Jelloun (Faculty Research Grant 2013)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Amira El Zein

Description:

Under this grant, Professor El-Zein continues her research on Francophone literature, with a focus on literature from North Africa in particular. It centers on the work of Morrocan Francophone writer, Tahar ben Jelloun due to his particular approach to immigration and gender.


Qatari Phrasebook and Culture Hints (Faculty Research Grant 2013)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Hany Fazza

Description:

Under this grant, Professor Fazza creates the very first phrasebook for the Qatari dialect. The book includes useful phrases for expatriates, travelers, and university students, both non-Arabic and Arabic speaking, and explains how to use polite phrases and simple requests. The phrasebook is accompanied with an audio compact disk to allow users to practice sounds and tones.


Sacred Interests: Islam and U.S. Foreign Relations, 1821-1921 (Faculty Research Grant 2013)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Karine Walther

Description:

Under this grant, Prof. Walther will work on a manuscript that documents the influence of American religious beliefs about Islam and Muslims on U.S. foreign relations beginning with the Greek War of Independence in 1821 and ending with President Woodrow Wilson’s proposal to Congress to take a mandate over Armenia after WWI. The influence of religion in shaping American formal and informal empire are central components of this work. The manuscript asks how American ideas and beliefs about Muslims, especially how they should be governed, controlled, converted, or colonized, shaped American policies abroad, while also engaging directly with European colonial policies.


Re-Envisioning Security in the Gulf (Faculty Research Grant 2013)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Mehran Kamrava

Description:

Professor Kamrava utilizes this grant to examine two interrelated questions regarding Persian Gulf security. Firstly, his research examines the nature of on-going and emerging security challenges dominating the Gulf region in the coming years. Secondly, his research looks at the degree to which regional and extra-regional actors are aware of these actual and potential threats – i.e. their threat perceptions – and whether or not they craft their foreign and security policies accordingly.


Issues in Comparative Mysticism (Faculty Research Grant 2013)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Patrick Laude

Description:

Professor Laude applies this grant to continue his inquiry on the metaphysics of relativity in world mystical traditions. His research touches upon two dimensions: firstly, ‘relativity within the Divine’, or ‘diversity within unity’, and secondly, ontological status of the non-Ultimate, or the manifold field of contingent reality. Professor Laude’s research provides a comparative examination of some of the most rigorous doctrines of the Absolute within a cross-religious spectrum of teachings of mystical metaphysics, including Hindu Advaita Vedanta and Kashmiri Shaivism, Madhyamaka and Hua Yen Buddism and Sufi Unicity of Existence or Wahdat al-wujud. The inquiry touches upon central questions, such as the ontological status of evil, the metaphysics of the feminine, and the function of the Word, Vibration and Name within the metaphysical economy of the onto-cosmic process.


Arabic Writing System and Dialects: From Phonology to Script (Faculty Research Grant 2013)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Yehia Mohamed

Description:

This project analyzes the new orthography of Arabic, the contract between spoken and written language in Arabic, and the influence of the dialectal Arabic phonological systems on the Arabic scripts. The study consequently provides a detailed linguistic analysis of Arabic new modified scripts in its relationship with the phonology of main urban dialects of the Arab world on the phonetic and the phonological levels of the phonemic structure.


Different Experiences of ‘Teaching Arabic for Special Purposes’ in the Arab World (Faculty Research Grant 2013)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Mahmoud Al-Ashiri

Description:

The purpose of this research strives, through an analytical descriptive method, to analyze and evaluate some of the most important experiences of ‘teaching Arabic for special purposes’ in the Arab world.


At Second Sight: Whitman, Du Bois, and the Material Vision of Trauma (Faculty Research Grant 2013)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Amy Nestor

Description:

Professor Nestor builds on a book manuscript entitled,Thingly Visions: The Materialism of 19th Century American Politics,under this grant. This particular chapter of the manuscript will fuse the theoretical realm of new materialism with trauma theory, as a way to understand visions of the traumatic structure of American history in the wake of the Civil War and slavery.


Presentation at Conseil International d’Etudes Francophones (CIEF), San Francisco, U.S.A.: Quest/ Conquest of New Worlds (Faculty Research Grant 2013)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Patricia Reynaud

Description:

Professor Reynaud is providing a presentation on “Prendre le Temps de Vivre: Le Mythe de L’Eldorado” within the session entitled ‘Maghrebi Writings’.


Emerging Sectarian Fault-lines and Regional Security in the Arab Revolution

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Mark Farha
  • Shahram Akbarzadeh, University of Deakin
  • Luciano Zaccara (Qatar University)

Description:

With colleagues at the University of Deakin, this project assesses the extent to which religious discourse is an integral part of identity politics in the Middle East, and/or is instrumentalised for political gain. It analyzes the relationship between internal and external dynamics in the Arab world and factors that contribute to regional instability. This research will shed new light on the role and significance of Islamist discourse, culture, and religion in setting foreign policy agendas in the post-revolutionary Arab states.


Encyclopedia of Islamic Bioethics

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Ayman Shabana

Description:

Drawing on their foundational work for a previous NPRP grant, the research team embarked on an ambitious project to develop the first Encyclopedia of Islamic Bioethics (EIB). Based on their exhaustive review of the large and diverse body of literature in this evolving area, the team incorporates the best practices of organizing and classifying ethical reflections on medical and scientific issues and applies them to pertinent discussion in Islam and the Muslim world. The EIB will serve as an accessible and reliable resource on bioethical thought in Islam and the Muslim world.


Advancing Financial Education for Transnational Families

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Ganesh Seshan
  • Suzi Mirgani
  • Ahwaz Akhtar (SFS-Q '16)
  • Hisham Hassan (SFS-Q '15)
  • Fatema Hubail (SFS-Q '16)
  • Salar Khan (SFS-Q '15)
  • Atul Menon (SFS-Q '15)
  • Salman Ahad Khan (SFS-Q '16)
  • Sherif Elgindi (SFS-Q '16)

Description:

This project was made possible by a UREP award (UREP 14-073-5-017) from the Qatar National Research Fund (a member of The Qatar Foundation). The statements made herein are solely the responsibility of the authors.

The purpose of this project is to design and pilot a financial literacy curriculum aimed at migrant households, and to produce a set of instructional videos on financial education using the contents of the curriculum. This initiative aims tocontribute to the education of the wider community in Qatar and elsewhere through a series of educational videos disseminated to migrants and their families. The film component of the project is a simple and effective way to deliver a powerful message on financial planning to migrants who perhaps have limited education and who have no history of long-term financial planning or ever receiving such advice. Thus, the project can help migrants and their families make informed decisions on issues related to saving and investments, planning, and avoiding high levels of indebtedness.


Religion in the Making of the Arabian Gulf States (Faculty Research Grant 2012)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Birol Baskan

Description:

Under this grant, Dr. Baskan continues his research on the role of religion, religious figures and religious institutions in the political development of Qatar, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates. The research engages with literature unanimously declaring the Arabian Gulf as exceptional and illustrates the familiar processes of state building that unfold in the region.


West African Religious Traditions: An Introduction (Faculty Research Grant 2012)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Akintunde Akinade

Description:

This project continues Dr. Akinade’s work on his book on West African religious history. The project relies on library and archival research in Ghana at Trinity Theology Seminary, in Nigeria at Obafemi Awolowo University and in New York at Burke Library, Union Theological Seminary. Based on historical and theological sources combined with ethnographic and anthropological research, the book will present a concise but thorough overview of the complex and dynamic religious life and experience in West Africa.


Variant Readings min Zajjaji’s ‘Jumal (Faculty Research Grant 2012)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Hana Zabarah

Description:

This project continues Dr. Zabarah’s work on AL-zAJJāJī’s Jumal. Dr Zabarah has discovered a contradictory statement on two of the editions of Jumal she has been studying - Cheneb’s (1957) and Hamad’s (1984). Most commentators accept the 1984 edition’s interpretation of the statement, while in theory, the 1957 edition’s interpretation seems more logical. The research centers on a reexamination of the original manuscripts of both editions of Jumal in order to shed further light on the differing interpretations.


Course Package: From Reading to Writing (Faculty Research Grant 2012)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Abbas Al-Tonsi

Description:

This project continues Al-Tonsi’s work on preparing Arabic teaching materials. The purpose of the project is to create a course package for first and second level Heritage learners at SFS-Qatar. The course package will address reading and writing skills in various social science and humanities disciplines, and provide interactive tools for learners to study basic grammar structures, fixing common mistakes, rhetorical devices, clichés, collocations and vocabulary building.


Do Tweets Affect the Behavior of Stocks? (Faculty Research Grant 2012)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Alexis Antoniades

Description:

This project will utilize the software TOPSY to analyze data on the volume of daily tweets about stocks and the stock market. Dr. Antoniades’s research focuses on whether tweets have any predictive power with regards to daily stock returns, the number of trades and volumes, and on stock volatility. This is one of the first studies to examine the relationship between social media and stock market performance.


The Syllabic Structure of the Arabic Dialects (Faculty Research Grant 2012)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Yehia Mohamed

Description:

This work involves a detailed linguistic analysis of the main urban dialects of the Arab world, as well as a comparative analysis of the relationship between the syllabic structure and the stress system of these dialects. This project will result in a more empirically-based definition of the relationship between Arabic phonemic consonants and vowels on the one hand, and the syllable and stress in Arabic dialects on the other.


The Journey as Quest in the Work of Amin Maalouf (Faculty Research Grant 2012)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Amira El Zein

Description:

This project continues Dr El-Zein’s work on her book about the Lebanese French author Amin Maalouf. Maalouf often uses ‘the journey’ motif in his work - plots and intrigues occur during voyages and encounters frequently happen on the road. Two overarching journey types are evident in his work - that of the journey as a guardian of love, and that of the journey as a quest to find a lost book. Specifically, this project will examine the importance of the latter journey type and will form the basis of a draft chapter on the subject for Dr. El-Zein’s book.


State-Building in the West Bank and Gaza (Faculty Research Grant 2012)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Mehran Kamrava

Description:

This research assesses processes of state building undertaken by the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) nearly two decades after its establishment. It will focus on four specific areas: the political and administrative agendas and efficacy of the PNA; demographic factors resulting from levels and patterns of population settlements and dispersions throughout the West Bank and the Gaza Strip; the extent to which Palestinian territories within the West Bank are geographically linked or disconnected from one another because of Israeli settlements, check-points and infrastructure networks; and the economic viability, dependence or independence of the PNA as an administrative and quasi-state organ. The project utilizes secondary data sources, semi-structured interviews and participant observation research methods.


Dimensions and Aspects of the Methaphysics of Relativity in Mystical Discourse (Faculty Research Grant 2012)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Patrick Laude

Description:

This project continues Dr Laude’s work on his book about metaphysical relativity in mystical theology. The project involves library and archival research in Paris at the Bibliothèque Nationale de France and the Bibliothèque Interuniversitaire des Langues Orientales; in Istanbul at the Library of the Islamic Research Center; in Beijing at the Institute for Advanced Humanistics Studies of Beijng University; and in India at several academic libraries. Utilizing these data sources, the project examines the treatment of the feminine in divinis in the philosophies of Kashmiris Shaivism, Advaita Vedanta, Chiese Hua Yen Buddhism and Sufism.


History of Marriage in Islam (Faculty Research Grant 2012)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Amira Sonbol

Description:

This project continues Dr. Sonbol’s work on her book about the history of marriage in Islam. The grant supports library and archival research in Egypt at the national archives, and in Jordan at the University of Amman. This research provides source materials on marriage contracts, divorces, deeds of property, child custody, legal decisions and governmental decrees dating from the Ottoman to more modern periods.


Domestic Effects of International Human Rights Treaty Ratification in the Member States of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Başak Çali
  • Mehran Kamrava
  • Adeela Tajdar

Description:

This research explores the processes of ratification and domestic effects of human rights treaties in the states of the Cooperation Council for the Arab States of the Gulf (GCC). This initiative is a joint venture between Georgetown University SFS-Q, Koc University, Oxford University, and Qatar University. It ismade possible by NPRP grant #5-804-5-123from the Qatar National Research Fund (a member of Qatar Foundation). The statements made herein are solely the responsibility of the authors.


Political Religious Cinema, Ecology, and Civil Society (Faculty Research Grant 2012)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Patricia Reynaud

Description:

In June 2013, under this grant, Prof. Reynaud attended the Conseil International d'Etudes Francophones conference in Mauritius where she presented a paper on the topic of islam, violence, and despair/hopein Yasmina Khadra's literature and cinema. In addition, in Jule 2013, she attended the French Association of Political Science 2013 Congress in Paris, where she presented the topics of cinema, film, and politics. This grant also supported Prof. Reynaud's research in India on political mobilization by a traditional religious institution (the Jiorthirpeeth) against development projects in the Himalayas.


India, Bangladesh, and the Teesta River (Faculty Research Grant 2012)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Robert Wirsing

Description:

This project continues Prof. Wirsing's research into river resource rivalry in South Asia. Specifically, this project investigates the political, economic, demographic, ecological, and strategic context in which India and Bangladesh's unsuccessful 2011 Teesta River treaty negotiations occured. The implications of the treaty's failure for the future of India-Bangladesh relations and for the prospects of attaining integrated regional management of the Ganges/Brahmaputra/Meghna (GBM) Basin are also considered. The project relies on data collected from site visits and semi-structured interviewed, as well as secondary data.


Science Productivity, Higher Education Development, and the Knowledge Society

Principal Investigator(s):

  • David P. Baker, Pennsylvania State University
  • Justin J.W. Powell, Martin Luther Universitat Halle-Wittenberg
  • John Crist
  • Manfred Stock, Martin Luther Universitat Halle-Wittenberg
  • Kazunori Shima, Hiroshima University
  • Liang Zhang, Pennslyvania University
  • Robert D. Reisz
  • Yuan-Chih Fu
  • Seung Wan Nam
  • Jennifer Dusdal
  • Roshi Moeini
  • Leena Nady Mohammad (SFS-Q'15)
  • Atul Menon (SFS-Q '15)
  • Hisham Hassan (SFS-Q '15)

Description:

In partnership with researchers at SFS-Qatar, the Pennsylvania State University in the U.S., the University of Halle-Wittenberg in Germany, the University of Hiroshima in Japan, and the University of Luxembourg, this multi-national project is a comparative analysis of the influence of higher education capacity on the development of the knowledge society through science productivity, as measured by publications in scientific journals. Through the analysis of data from 1900 to the present, the project addresses important policy questions about education capacity by comparing nations with long histories of university development and science productivity with nations pursuing new and accelerated policies for scientific capacity building.


Piety and Power: Charismatic Religious Movements in Nigeria and the Diaspora (Faculty Research Grant 2011)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Akintunde Akinade

Description:

Professor Akinade’s research is a theological and historical study of charismatic religious movements in Nigeria and the diaspora. The project deals with the resurgence of Christian renewal movements in Nigeria and focuses on two in particular: the Redeemed Christian Church of God and the Christ Apostolic Church. These two Christian denominations have continued to experience exponential growth and transformation in Nigeria and in the diaspora. Their interpretation of the Bible, creative gender dynamics, the appropriation of different spiritual gifts, charismatic fervor, and focus on the Holy Spirit are enduring contributions to the story of world Christianity today.


Metaphysics of Relativity in Mystical Theology (Faculty Research Grant 2011)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Patrick Laude

Description:

This research focuses on mystical theology’s treatment of the relationship between the Ultimate Reality and the non-ultimate. It involves a comparative examination of some of the most rigorous doctrines of the Absolute within a cross-religious spectrum of teachings of mystical theology, including Hindu Advaita Vedanta and Kashmiri Shaivism, Madhyamaka Buddhism and Sufi ‘Unicity of Existence’ or wahdat al-wujud.


Selection of papers for publication at the Université d’Aix en Provence (Faculty Research Grant 2011)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Patricia Reynaud

Description:

This project prepares selected papers presented at The Problem of Evil Conference in March 2012 for publication in a dedicated volume. The work will be conducted in close partnership with the Université d’Aix en Provence, the conference co-organizer, who will be publishing the volume.


Women and Family in Islam, a History (Faculty Research Grant 2011)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Amira Sonbol

Description:

This project compares marriage contracts from the northern Mediterranean and contracts from the southern Mediterranean - namely Egypt and Jordan - as part of a wider study of Mediterranean marriage and family traditions in a forthcoming book titled History of Marriage in Islam. This type of comparative study is particularly important for the Islamic world because it reveals that laws dealing with family and gender may have religious roots but are, in fact, man-made.


Production of a Media Arabic Textbook for Heritage Learners (Faculty Research Grant 2011)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Abbas Al-Tonsi

Description:

This project will result in the publication of a textbook that combines authentic texts from various regions of the Arab world, covering the main historical events from 1943 to present time. The text will present the development of the language and will also reflect ideology-connoted aspects of the relationship between language and media.


An Experiment of Human Cooperation among Workers from Kerala in Qatar (Faculty Research Grant 2011)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Alexis Antoniades

Description:

This project examines how interactions with a foreign economic and social environment may affect the level of cooperation in the Ultimatum Game (UG) experiment. Specifically, the UG will be administered to a group of laborers in Qatar to see how variations in the time spent in Qatar and religious background may affect the outcome of the game. This project is a collaboration between Professor Antoniades and Professor Ganesh Seshan from Georgetown SFS-Q, and Professor Robertas Zubrickas from the University of Zurich.


The Power to Say No: Freedom, Property and Basic Income (Faculty Research Grant 2011)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Karl Widerquist

Description:

This project examines the economic conditions needed to support Effective ControlSelf-Ownership freedom. The research suggests that for this state to be achieved, an unconditional basic income and direct access to resources are required.


Religion in Amin Maalouf’s Fictional History (Faculty Research Grant 2011)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Amira El Zein

Description:

This project continues Professor El-Zein’s monograph writing on the Lebanese-French author, Amin Maalouf. The work entails an analysis of Maalouf’s concept of religion, which is portrayed in the midst of challenging empires, declining dynasties, atrocious crusades, budding civilizations and other religions.


River Resource Conflict in South Asia (Faculty Research Grant 2011)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Robert Wirsing

Description:

With water stress and scarcity conditions now developing rapidly in South Asian states, water resource issues are occupying increasingly greater space in the domestic and foreign policy agendas of the region. Prof. Wirsing's research focuses on interstate river resource issues in the South Asian region. It undertakes to assess the potential contribution of these issues to regional conflict and cooperation.


Phonology of Arabic Dialects: A Comparative Study (Faculty Research Grant 2011)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Yehia Mohamed

Description:

Prof. Mohamed's study is composed of two parts: a descriptive analysis of the phonetic and phonological features of the major Arabic dialects and a comparative look at the features of these urban dialects. The study will document the sounds of these dialects and describe their physical attributes such as the phonetic nature of consonants and vowels through spectrogram analysis. The phonological analysis will take an in-depth look at the phonemes of each dialect and analyze prosodic features such as syllabic structure and stress.


Exporting the Alaska Model: Can the Permanent Fund Dividend be Adapted as a Reform Model Around the World? (Faculty Research Grant 2010)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Karl Widerquist

Description:

The Permanent Fund Dividend (PFD) is enormously popular in Alaska. Supporters argue that it has helped Alaska maintain stable growth, a low poverty rate, and the lowest level of economic inequality in the United States. If this is true, if it works in Alaska, can this policy model be adapted to work in other places? Is this model possible only in places with large resource-based industries, or can countries with modest resource bases also apply this model? Prof. Widerquist's research project will investigate these questions.


Mobile Faith: African Immigrant Churches in the United States (Faculty Research Grant 2010)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Akintunde Akinade

Description:

Prof. Akinade's research maps African immigrants and their religious communities in the United States. The project is a historical, theological, and ethnographic study of the Christ Apostolic Church in New York City and in Washington, D.C. established in 1918 in Nigeria, the CAC now has more than 300 parishes in the U.S. The CAS is generally acclaimed as Nigeria's first Pentecostal church that has been transformed into a global church with congregations all over the world. Prof. Akinade's research agenda entails an interdisciplinary study of what African immigrant churches are doing religously in the U.S. and what manner of religious institutions they are developing by and for themselves.


Media Arabic: Textbook for Arabic Heritage Learners (Faculty Research Grant 2010)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Abbas Al-Tonsi

Description:

This project will create Volume I of a textbook for intermediate Arabic language heritage learners. The suggested textbook includes news items from various Arabic newspapers that cover the important events, especially in relation to the Middle East in order to introduce the main vocabulary and structures in the Arabic media and provide the students with the historical and cultural background necessary to understand the present reality in the region.


In the Shadow of Languages and Places: Revisiting Amin Maalouf's Concept of Identity (Faculty Research Grant 2010)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Amira El Zein

Description:

This project continues Prof. El-Zein's monograph writing on the Labanese/French author Amin Maalouf. With the aim of broadening the scope of the discussion by comparing Maalouf's treatment of identity to that of contemporary Arab writers, Prof. El-Zein will unveil the mechanisms that make Maalouf comfortable with the notion of multiple indentities rather than melancholic and despondent.


Does the Law of One Price Hold? Evidence from Scanner Data in Seven Countries (Faculty Research Grant 2010)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Alexis Antoniades

Description:

The Law of One Price (LOP) states that prices of identical goods-adjusted for exchange rate differences and transportation costs-must be equal across locations.To test this hypothesis, price and quantity data for identical goods are needed. Prof. Antoniades's work with scanner data in the Gulf enables him to have price and quantity data across seven countries at the highest level of disaggregation, the bar code. What is missing, however, is the country of origin for each product. By augmenting his existing data with country of origin information, Prof. Antoniades will be able to do ground-breaking work on the Law of One Price and will also study what part of inflation in the Gulf region is imported.


An Islamist- Liberal Project: Democratizing Turkey (Faculty Research Grant 2010)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Birol Baskan

Description:

Prof. Baskan's project tackles the following: How did the coalition between Islamists and Liberals come into being in Turkey? Who are the agents who formed and sustained that coalition? How did both sides come to similar terms? What role did the international community play in bringing about and sustaiing this coalition? And how likely is this coalition to survive? The project will contribute to the existing literature on democratization, state-religion relatons, political Islam, and grass-root religious communities in the Middle East by raising new critical questions for further reflection in the area.


Phonology of Gulf Arabic: A Comparative Study of Urban Dialects (Faculty Research Grant 2010)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Yehia Mohamed

Description:

Prof. Mohamed's study is composed of two parts: 1) a descriptive analysis of the phonetic and phonological features of the major urban dialects of the Arab Gulf region: Emirati, Bahraini, Kuwaiti, Omani, Qatari, and the eastern region of Saudi Arabic and 2) presents a comparative look at the features of these urban dialects. The study will document the sounds of these dialects and describe their physical attributes such as the phonetic nature of consonants and vowels through an in depth look at the phonemes of each dialect and analyze prosodic features such as syllabic structure and stress. Data will be collected and analyzed from open source materials already available in the linguistic market (i.e. audio and video materials originating from across the Gulf).


The Case of Muriel Barbary's The Elegance of the Hedgehog (Faculty Research Grant 2010)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Patricia Reynaud

Description:

Prof. Reynaud will present a paper in a panel she is organizing at the 25th International Congress of the International Council of Francophone Studies in Aix-en-Provence. Her panel is entitled, The Art of the Paradox in Barbary's The Elegance of the Hedgehog. Professor Reynaud's contribution will address and discuss the following questions: Does this novel, published in 2006, which has known a worldwide success and has been translated in 34 languages, belong legitimately to the category of world-literature in French?


The Influence of India on French Philosophy (Faculty Research Grant 2009)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Patricia Reynaud

Description:

In 2007, Prof. Reynaud received a research grant to coauthor a book on the influence of India on French philosophy, with a specific focus on three French-speaking authors: Rene Guenon, Frithjof Schuon, and Alain Danielou. Prof. Reynaud intends to go back to India to conduct further interviews in order to complement the information gathered from secondary western sources.


History, Ruins, Voices: Herman Melville's Clarel (Faculty Research Grant 2009)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Amy Nestor

Description:

Melville's Clarel, a poem recounting a pilgrimage through the Holy Land, has seen renewed interest in recent years. Prof. Nestor plans to read the poem through Melville's reading of Dante's politics and philosophy of history, and produce an article on her findings.


Islam and the Ethics of War: A History (Faculty Research Grant 2009)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Amira Sonbol

Description:

Since September 11, 2001, enemies of Islam on the one hand and apologists for Islam on the other have been busy in compiling what is sometimes termed "Islamic war ethics" or "war ethics in Islam." Prof. Sonbol will draw connections between the historical contexts that produced these formulations, to place contemporary theories of Islamic war within the frameworks that produced them. The research will be used to complete a book on the subject of Islam and the ethics of war.


The Feminine in Religions (Faculty Research Grant 2009)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Patrick Laude

Description:

The last decades have witnessed a growing scholarly attention to the role and contribution of women to world religions. Prof. Laude is conducting a study that will examine cross-religious patterns of the metaphysics of the feminine in world religions. The project aims at providing a rigorous conceptual framework and a comprehensive array of critical tools of interpretation and assessment for the study of traditional metaphysical concepts of the feminine.


Qatar Study of Migrant Families (Faculty Research Grant 2009)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Ganesh Seshan

Description:

While remittances bring numerous benefits to households in developing countries, little is known about the extent to which remittance flows are reduced by the migrants' lack of ability to monitor or control the way such remittances are spent. Prof. Seshan will conduct the first study, focusing on the Filipino community in Qatar, aimed at providing migrants overseas with financial services that help them work toward their financial goals by using innovative financial tools in order to maximize the benefits of sending remittances.


Ambassadors of Christ: African Immigrant Churches in New York City (Faculty Research Grant 2009)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Akintunde Akinade

Description:

Prof. Akinade is conducting research on African immigrants and their religious communities in the United States. The research will focus on the congregational life within the Redeemed Christian Church of God in all boroughs of New York City. This study promises to articulate the issues, concerns, and paradigms that are relevant to African religious communities in the United States.


Innovation vs. Imitation in the Pharmaceutical Sector (Faculty Research Grant 2009)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Alexis Antoniades

Description:

This project examines why some firms choose to innovate (high cost, high risk, high return strategy) whereas other firms choose to imitate (low cost, low risk, low return strategy). Understanding why firms choose to imitate over innovate can help policy makers come up with policies that foster innovation and the creation of knowledge.


Amin Maalouf's Work: A Bridge between Cultures (Faculty Research Grant 2009)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Amira El Zein

Description:

Although many of Amin Maalouf's books are translated in English, there is yet a single book of criticism in English devoted to his work. Prof. El-Zein's research will consist of continuing the work she began last year on Maalouf with the goal of developing such a book. It will give English readers the opportunity to have access to his stance and help decode the main symbols that pervade his fiction and essays as well.


Motivation, Skills, Needs, and Expectations of Heritage Learner Students (Faculty Research Grant 2009)

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Yehia Mohamed

Description:

Prof. Mohamed's research will consist of comparing the motivation, needs, and expectations of heritage language learners of Arabic at the School of Foreign Service in Qatar with those collected from an earlier survey at Georgetown University's main campus. The comparison is expected to provide much needed details about the contrasts and similarities between heritage students form an environment where the heritage language is not the language of their country of residence. The results of the study will contribute to the further development of the Arabic curriculum at Georgetown's Qatar campus.


Conflict Resolution by Qatar and Saudi Arabia: New Roles in Regional Diplomacy

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Mehran Kamrava
  • Katja Niethammer

Description:

This research addressed four key questions with regards to Saudi Arabia and Qatar’s proactive engagement in regional diplomacy and conflict resolution. Firstly, the underlying reasons behind Saudi and Qatari efforts at regional conflict resolution. Secondly, the modus operandi employed by each country in mediating conflict. Thirdly, the extent to which Qatar and Saudi Arabia had the institutional capacity to implement their roles as conflict mediators. Fourthly, the significance of their efforts at conflict resolution from both theoretical and policy perspectives.


Pedagogy for Heritage Learners

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Abbas Al-Tonsi
  • Hana Zabarah
  • Yehia Mohamed
  • Amira El Zein

Description:

This project examined Arabic language instruction in Qatar, created an Arabic language proficiency module for learners and developed an Arabic curriculum for heritage learners.


Qatar Study of Migrant Families

Principal Investigator(s):

  • Ganesh Seshan
  • Dean Yang, University of Michigan