Arabic Language Program and Arabic Minor

Georgetown University hosts one of the strongest university-level Arabic Language Programs in the world. Building on that tradition, Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in Qatar is proud to offer a rich program in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) as both a Foreign Language and as a Heritage Language to meet the needs of students in the Gulf region. All Arabic language courses employ innovative pedagogy in a culturally rich environment and use course materials published by world-renown scholars in Arabic language learning.
 
The MSA Foreign Language Program is designed for students who have no linguistic or cultural background in Arabic.
 
The MSA Heritage Language Program is designed for students with some colloquial or cultural knowledge of Arabic.

Program Goals

Both the Arabic Foreign Language Program and the Arabic Heritage Language Program are designed to help students attain proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic. Emphasis is placed throughout on the development and utilization of fundamental reading, writing, listening and speaking skills. Students who continue their studies beyond the advanced level in either program have the opportunity to develop their MSA skills to the highest levels of proficiency. This will enable them to communicate effectively in Arabic in academic, professional, and social contexts.
 

Curriculum for Language Program

MSA Foreign Language Program 

MSA Foreign Language courses are delivered at three levels:

  • ARAB 011 & 012 -- Intensive 1st Level MSA, I & II (6 credit hours each)

  • ARAB 111 & 112 -- Intensive 2nd Level MSA, I & II (6 credit hours each)

  • ARAB 215 & 216 -- Intensive 3rd Level MSA, I & II (6 credit hours each)
     

MSA Heritage Language Program

MSA Heritage Language courses are delivered at three levels:

  • ARAB 020 & 021 Introductory MSA for Heritage Speakers, I & II (6 credit hours each)
  • ARAB 120 & 121 Intermediate MSA for Heritage Speakers, I & II (3 credit hours each)
  • ARAB 220 & 221 Advanced MSA for Heritage Speakers, I & II (3 credit hours each)
     

Post-Advanced Arabic Courses*

Upon completion of 3rd Level/Advanced MSA instruction, students in both Foreign Language Program and the Heritage Language Program can continue their language studies in a variety of topical and thematic courses:

  • ARAB 316 Arabic Language and Politics
  • ARAB 320 Arab Film
  • ARAB 329 Arabic Formal Writing
  • ARAB 335 Introduction to the Arabic Short Story
  • ARAB 340 Arabic Drama
  • ARAB 341 Modern Arabic Poetry
  • ARAB 355 Composition and Style
  • ARAB 359 Identity and Globalization in the Contemporary Arabic World
  • ARAB 365 Arabic Gulf Literature
  • ARAB 380 Topics in the Arab World
  • ARAB 403 Islam and Arabic Culture in the Golden Age
  • ARAB 431 Language Policy and Development in the Arab World
  • ARAB 453 Heritage and Modernity in Arabic Literature
     

Courses about Arabic taught in English*

Upon completion of 1st Level / Introductory MSA instruction, students in both the Foreign Language Program and the Heritage Language Program can learn more about Arabic language and culture in a variety of topical and thematic courses offered in English:

  • ARAB 261 Inside Arabic: How it Works
  • ARAB 270 Variations in Standard Arabic and Dialects
  • ARAB 324 The Journey of Arabic
  • ARAB 331 Arabian Nights in Western Literature
  • ARAB 393 Arabic Sociolinguistics

*Course offerings vary by semester. Some courses have prerequisites.
 

How to Enroll

  • Currently, only students registered as undergraduates at Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in Qatar or one of its Education City partner universities can register for Arabic language courses.
  • How to cross-register for Arabic language courses at Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in Qatar: Interested students should contact the registrar at their home university for information about cross-registration.
  • Placement test: All students are required to take an Arabic placement test before enrolling in courses. The placement test is designed to determine if a student should follow the Foreign Language Program or the Heritage Language Program. It will also determine at what level of instruction a student will begin his/her studies.

 

Arabic Minor

SFS-Q students graduating in May 2018 and afterwards are now eligible to pursue an Arabic Minor. The Arabic minor will require students to complete seven courses and to demonstrate proficiency in Arabic. Students may elect to pursue both a minor and a certificate, along with their other graduation requirements, as long as they can complete the requirements for all in time for graduation. To declare the minor, review the Arabic minor requirements, ensure that you can complete the requirements for the minor in time for graduation, then complete the Arabic Minor Declaration Form to declare the minor. In the future, students will declare the minor when they declare the major, but students who have already declared their majors may apply for the minor between now and Fall 2017.

If you have any questions about the minor requirements and your graduation, please consult your decanal advisor.

We look forward to seeing a strong showing of new Arabic minors in the May 2018 graduates!

 

 

Arabic Minor Course Requirements

SFS-Q students will have different trajectories through the minor depending upon their performance on the SFS-Q Arabic placement exam:

  • Example 1: If a student places in introductory Arabic I (either heritage or non-heritage), then the seven courses required for the Arabic minor will consist of the six sequential semesters of Arabic instructional coursework plus one post-advanced Arabic course.
  • Example 2: If a student places at the post-advanced level in Arabic, then the seven classes required for the Arabic minor will consist of one post-advanced Arabic class and six other Arabic courses. These can include some combination of other post-advanced Arabic courses, or Arabic skills classes, with no more than one course in English about Arabic language and/or culture.
  • Example 3: If a student places in intermediate or advanced Arabic language classes (either heritage or non-heritage), then the seven classes required for the Arabic minor will consist of all Arabic instruction courses through Advanced Arabic II, one post-advanced Arabic course, and then some combination of other post-advanced Arabic courses, or Arabic skills classes, with no more than one course in English about Arabic language and/or culture.

 

Arabic Minor Advanced, Transfer Credit and Study Abroad

No more than three courses from outside of Georgetown (advanced credit, transfer credit, summer, and study abroad) can count toward the minor. If a student has two classes of advanced credit, a year of study abroad, and one transfer class, only three of those five classes can apply to the Arabic minor. Below are the limits for each:

  • A student can bring in up to two advanced credit classes to count toward the minor.
  • A student can bring in up to one study abroad class to the minor if away for a semester, or up to two classes to the minor if away for the academic year.
  • A student can transfer in up to one class toward the minor. Georgetown summer programs that carry Georgetown course prefixes and numbers (excluding study abroad, as noted above) do not count against transfer limits.

Georgetown credit for advanced and transfer language credit is pending language placement. If a student took a year of Introductory Arabic, but then subsequently places into the first year of Introductory Arabic at SFS-Q, the student does not receive transfer credit for that year of Arabic taken elsewhere.

 

 

Arabic Minor Course Double-Counting

Courses required for the language minor can double-count with a core requirement (like HALC), but cannot double count with a major, another minor, or a certificate – unless the certificate is an area studies certificate, like CARS, that requires language. In that case language courses required for CARS may double count for the minor and certificate, primarily because the language is not the primary component of the certificate.